Hollywood’s Retirement Home Era

Eli

Day One FM I've just submitted my UPS long haul driver application. You guys see that?

Trey

No, wait, can you explain? I keep seeing some UPS things.

Eli

Yeah, I know it is kind of just turned into a meme now but basically so their contract was up and they were negotiating with the union or the drivers were negotiating the drivers union was negotiate with ups for you know, I think good cause. There tons, I don't think that UPS trucks are outfitted with air conditioning, which, seeing as we've just

Trey

Well there are no doors, so.

Eli

Okay, but what are your metal box. Seeing as we've just lived through the hottest month on record ever. I think air conditioning is not an unreasonable ask. But anyway, so now, as part of the renewed contract, the base salary for a long haul UPS driver is $170,000. Which to Twitter seems like a lot of money. It is a lot of money, but you know, more inflation...

Trey

That's more than the annual average salary, so.

Eli

Yeah, well, the annual average salary I think is like 80-something thousand dollars. Yeah. Anyway, that's not the that's not the topic of today's podcast. But yeah. I mean, I do wonder what the application but I wonder if it's like, you're when you're a pilot, for when you fly commercial, you have to fly like a certain amount of hours before your commercial pilot.

Trey

I think they have to go through a bit more of a process than UPS. No, this is no no discredit to the..

Clara

The talented men and women of UPS. Yeah, that's true. There was actually an interesting article a while ago about like long haul truckers which UPS drivers or not, but basically like the long haul trucking community is suffering like huge cuts to salary, which used to be like a pretty solid, like median income job. Yeah, the delivery community been reading a lot, hearing a lot, right.

Trey

Right way to get away from the wife and kids for a while.

Clara

Keeping an ear to the ground.

Eli

Well, all right, last point on this, have you seen that like, Tik Tok that's been circulating on Twitter, because that's usually how these things go of that woman being like, this is why I can't have coffee because my husband has to sit with me for three and a half hours.

Trey

Oh, yeah. Like, she like only has gums in her mouth.

Eli

Yeah, that's, besides the point and all those all the quotes, tweets are like, I know he finds reasons to stay at work late or something. Man anyway, today on the pod, I want to talk about gerontocracy, which is ruled by the elderly, because that seems to be a common theme, not just in our government, where we have, you know, Dianne Feinstein who needs to be reminded of what vote she is putting in for, you know, hundreds of millions of dollars of war funding to you know, Mitch, the glitch McConnell, but gerontocracy is elsewhere in our culture, most notably in Hollywood, where the industry seems to really be struggling to mint new talent. Like there's, it's kind of hard to tell. I feel like what a what a Timothee Chalamet movie is or what a insert, you know, younger talent movie might be. Who's the girl in euphoria?

Trey

Zendaya.

Eli

Zendaya. What a Zandaya movie might be.

Trey

No, Zendaya.

Eli

Zendaya, excuse me. But we all know what a Tom Cruise movie is, or a Denzel Washington, etc. So I don't know you, Chris Rock. Sure. I don't know if this is something that you all have been seeing as well. Maybe not just in movies, maybe in music, too. But I just want to kick things off there.

Trey

Well, yeah, I think there's a really interesting point where before actors would really try hard to diversify the roles they were getting. So they can say like, I have done the Charlize Theron like monster movie and the Charlize Theron. You know, blonde, what is it called? This like assassin movie? She's done.

Clara

Oh, atomic blonde.

Trey

Atomic blonde. Yeah. So I think there's been like, you know, all actors always want to work with new directors and diversify their roles. But that's not really the point here. The point is, like, if you were a surefire bet on a specific type of genre movie, whether it's action or thriller, or whatever, you would be cast in those roles forever and ever. Amen. Which would kind of like meant your status in Hollywood because you see one Vin Diesel car movie and you associate Vin Diesel with a good car thriller. And you go back to the theater because Vin Diesel is going to deliver on the thrill ride of another car movie. But I think there's just something something's going on here. There's something in the water.

Clara

Yeah, I feel like we talked about this back On our pod or pablomatic pod, I can't remember what the context of it was. But I do remember talking about how, you know, trying to make a name for yourself in a media slash, like, I guess entertainment ecosystem that's so like franchise built, where like, you're not really the star that IP is the star. And you're not really kind of like, for lack of a better word, like co-creating that IP with the studio as their kind of like lead star, you know, to your point. Like, I think Vin Diesel is a good example of that of like, he's sort of become synonymous with like, a certain type of action movie.

Trey

Or my favorite is like the have you seen the meme where The Rock is like, these are four different The Rock movies, and it's like four stills of the movies. And he looks like the same in the same jungle shirt and like a lush jungle behind him or something.

Clara

I haven't seen that. But like, sounds on par for The Rock. Right? I mean, I think the other thing too, which may be, you know, speaks to like, the broader climate is that, you know, we don't really have maybe the monoculture that we did even like 10 years ago, just based off of like, the way that so much entertainment has like migrated to streaming services where like, you might not see yellow jackets, and think of like, the girl who plays young, whatever plays one of the young girls, like you might not see her and be like, oh, that's a new rising talent or like, you might not have watched euphoria, and you might not be as familiar with Zendaya.

Trey

Zendaya.

Clara

Zendaya. Gosh, sorry, to Zendaya. Um, but I do think there's like a lot to the fact that like, streaming has also kind of fractured a bit of star power, that it's harder, I think, for someone to have like the mass consumption or like mass appeal, unless you're in something like, I don't know, Barbie, maybe. But I just don't think like stars are being seen by as many people consistently as they may be used to be, if that makes sense.

Eli

Yeah, apparently is very.

Trey

Yeah and I, there's a really interesting clip that has, I'm not gonna say viral, but it's like, repeatedly come back, you know, intermittently over the course of the past five years or something, where Ethan Hawke is doing an interview, like some kind of junket. And the guy who is asking questions is like, you know, why do all these sequels and stuff get made or whatever, and he's like, it's because there was a very successful model in Hollywood of how a movie would come out in theaters, then they would be, maybe it wouldn't even make its whole budget back. But then there wouldn't be a DVD release. And the DVD sales would account for like the budget plus more, it was basically a second financial bump in the life cycle of a film release, which kind of signal to the studios that like this kind of a movie, this indie, whatever movie that perhaps wasn't initially popular, does have massive legs and like fan appeal. And can mint stars like a Timothee Chalamet in call me by your name, for example. And with the loss of that business model, as we've transitioned to streaming, which was just an experiment that, like, kept going without actually any projections of how well it would do for Hollywood, we've sort of lost that financial second bump, or, you know, that would kind of underlying why we could make these movies. So now that we're just like, shooting for the stars and releasing any old thing on streaming. It makes sense that like, there's no stars coming out of it, because we're shifting to IP releases. And we're just relying on like, I think there's a new turtle Ninja Turtles movie out. Which apparently is very good. And I'm gonna see it probably because what else is there to see? But it's kind of it makes sense to me.

Eli

Yeah. It's also interesting in the context of like, the technology, which is, like, part of the flashpoint of the strikes, notably, kind of advanced deep fakes that allows studios to use like B likeness of actors, like long after they're in a movie or put their face on a different actor. This technology has also been used for de-aging. So it's like that type of AI, for instance, in the Irishman, or also in the new Indiana Jones movie, where they de-aged Harrison Ford, who's like in his late 80s, speaking of gerontocracy, where it's like the focus is now on using these tools to just make older actors look younger, instead of just trying to find younger actors who could maybe do better in the movie, maybe not do better. But I think part of the other reason why they use like de-aging technology is because, again, it's a proven bet that like, oh, people want to go see the Indiana Jones with Harrison Ford. They don't want to go see the Indiana Jones with Paul Mezcal or whatever.

Clara

I mean.

Eli

Yeah, I mean, but again, that takes out all of the novelty element from like going to see a movie. You just know what you're what you're there to expect, but. I guess. But there's like, I feel like there's levels to it, where I feel like all of these established actors, I'm not saying like, they have no good reason to strike. But they're also at the top of the like, Hollywood food chain. You know what I mean? Like, I think Tom Cruise is raking in tens, if not hundreds of millions of dollars from these films. And yes, it is problematic, like the living standards and the labor standards of working in Hollywood surely are less than they were previously due to streaming due to, you know, the growing emphasis on franchises and IP. But I would be more concerned if you're like the lower tier actor or the the extra, but I'm neither. So I don't know.

Trey

Those old folks are the ones whose careers are probably the most threatened. Like if we have already 10 examples of The Rock in the jungle movie, guess who AI is coming after first? If you just like, barely emote in the jungle and look like The Rock, you better believe I can make that on midjourney. And like..

Clara

And I don't know not to take us far off what we're talking about in terms of like, whatever, mainstream talent but I was listening, there's a segment on NPR about like how extras are really concerned about how studios are basically asking them to give consent for like body scans, where basically like, you know, if you have a scene in Game of Thrones or whatever, they'll have a battle scene. And then some of those people will be then like aI generated, they'll kind of like backfill additional people. So it seems like 1000s Are there versus just a few 100. But now with AI of sort of having progressed to the place that it has, they could potentially like fill a restaurant with fake people. And that would I mean, in addition to being just like, really weird, and I wonder also as an actor who's like a lead actor, how do you act against an empty restaurant? Like I feel like, surely that's also kind of an artistic hindrance, but any, in any case, they were talking about how like, if you lose extras, you also lose like what was a really powerful like talent development pool of like, I feel like even when you watch movies and shows from the 90s you see like background actors or like Carrie Bradshaw's like weird boyfriend, and it's all like some famous guy or like he became famous later, but yeah, I don't know. I feel like it's the AI stuff like affects both ends, like pretty significant

Eli

Total non-sequitur. But just on the AI sec. piece for a second. I was reading this piece about Zoom. I know very exciting. And it said Zoom made changes to its terms of service back in March. But concern only spiked this past weekend after Hacker News posted highlight after Hacker News post highlighted that changes appeared to give the company unbounded rights to use content to train its AI systems, which is just like, oh, all of our meetings are being used to train. Well, I don't know.

Trey

So they are tracking my facial movements.

Eli

Yes. yes. Sorry Trey.

Clara

Did I ever tell you guys about like the Enron thing? This connects back?

Eli

Nah. Was this the emails? Yeah, this is like, where are the emails?

Clara

No, this was like how they basically when Enron was like, you know, completely gutted and legitimately so perhaps, like they had, you know, they were one of the first companies or not one of the first but like one of the first companies that basically like in the chorus of all these, like hearings and trials, all of these emails were leaked, or not leaked, but like presented as evidence. And so I can't remember who it was. Maybe it was Google, but like to train the predictive text bot. They basically had this entire pool of like, old Enron emails to like train the robot on so like, the first predictive text robot was like trained on Enron emails, a lot of which were like personal messages of like, Google being like, oh, like so and so is such a bitch. And like all of that stuff, too. But I do think like, the Zoom thing is scary. I hadn't heard about that. But it's also like not surprising. I mean, I had data.

Eli

It's very like boring dystopia. You're like, why should I care about that? And then it's like, Okay, wait.

Trey

That's why I think this is so scary is because this is kind of happening at a pace with which we cannot keep up really, like most people don't know about this stuff. But also, it's happening in such a mundane way, that it's hard to get angry at it, but we should be extremely angry. You know, I'm you know, and I mean,

Clara

I agree.

Trey

We should be like rioting in the streets. If you're, you know, I feel like there's many people who, whose whole platform is built on like, personal data being stolen and privacy and like, don't invade very, like libertarian movement, kind of vibes where it's like, less government, whatever, you know, I mean, the government's probably doing its own AI program, but I just think it's like, these big corporations are literally harvesting our data to inform how their systems will probably at some point, take over yours and my job, and we're just kind of sitting here like, yeah, I read this boring Zoom article about it.

Eli

I mean, the thing is like, this is just like meet the new boss same as the old boss situation where like that has been happening with digital advertising and like all of these social media platforms, Google, beep, company who essentially just harvest our data without our consent, or they make the like terms of service agreement, so arcane and the text and you know, point five font that you're like, fuck it, I'm just going to click accept, and they harvest our data to enrich themselves. Sorry, now this is like big tinfoil hat, but they, you know, harvest our data and our digital behavior to, you know, enrich themselves and sell advertising against and we don't see, we don't see a dime on that. And now I think it's now I think people are like, okay, well, we're not going to let this happen again, like you can't scrape our data to inform your models to then monetize it for yourself and not give us a cut. Which I think is like part of the whole thing with the with the Hollywood strike. It's like all about you know, consent, compensation and control like they people want those three things. What Lucas Shaw was talking about in his AI piece, which I would implore everyone to read, but yeah, you don't you don't hear a presidential candidate talking about that.

Trey

But it's 100 degrees. Who's controlling the air conditioner? The media. The media will say he looks so sweaty, but it was.. That my horrible Trump accent.

Eli

That was Trump? I thought that was supposed to be like, DeSantis.

Trey

No, no, didn't you see that clip where he was like, literally pouring sweat. And he's like, who's in charge of the AC? Great job by the way? It's 100 degrees.

Eli

That's that's like a that's like a mid Atlantic.

Trey

I'm working on it. It's a work in progress.

Eli

All right, shifting gears I wanted to speak to or hoping that you might speak to this Trey about a tweet from Pop-base before I dive in. What the hell is Pop-base, Pop-crave all of these pops like why are they so ubiquitous on the platform now?

Trey

Well, there was an article about that recently wasn't there?

Eli

Yeah, I mean, I skim through and I like I kind of get that it's, it's kind of like a they do everything they do politics. They do pop culture. They do you know, so and so just posted this selfie? Like.

Trey

Shines a new selfie.

Eli

Yeah, but why are they everywhere? Is it just because the platform is so terrible now that I'm only served Pop-crave and Pop-base?

Trey

Well, I think it's just a matter that they can break news first and get credit for it. And so, you know, they are an aggregator essentially, but they're just severely online. Pop stands for the most part who reached the news first and disseminated tonight?

Eli

Y'all good? All right. Well, anyway, the tweet reads, music executives tell billboard that they're worried and depressed which s a strong word. As the industry struggles to find big artists breakthroughs, noting Olivia Rodrigo and Ice Spice as the last recently successful ones, quote, no one nobody knows how to break music right now. Each person I talked to in the industry is more depressed about this than the person I talked to before them. So I feel like in Hollywood, in the music industry, as well as Hollywood, there's kind of a crisis of novelty of new breakthrough artists. What say you?

Trey

Well, question for the room. Like who's number one on Billboard right now?

Eli

Drake? Taylor Swift?

Trey

I mean, I don't know the answer, but. Point is like, who is breaking through?

Eli

Morgan Wallen?

Trey

Oh, is that what's that?

Clara

Oh, the country guy?

Eli

Yeah. Luke Combs. Travis Scott. Taylor Swift.

Trey

Yeah, I think okay so first of all, to kind of prove this theory correct. Ice spice went viral on Tik Tok, because she participated in like, bussin challenge or something.

Eli

No, she, no, that's not true. I know.

Trey

That's true.

Eli

Is it? Well, she had she had a song Munch.

Trey

No this was before that. So she first went viral on Tik Tok because she participated in this like viral trend called like what's bussin or who's bussin or something? Right You're like kind of dressed in a dowdy outfit. And then like you transition to that really hourglass figure type outfit, and the crowd went wild. Which, you know, I think like that proves that Tik Tok has the power to kind of meet new stars and is like the maybe soul app to you know, do that in today's day and age. And then Olivia Rodrigo literally came through the very tried and true Disney machine. Like there's nothing new about her breaking as an artist. She was literally like she Selena Gomez-ed, or Miley Cyrus-ed or like pick one. You know what I mean?

Eli

Was she that big on Disney Channel.

Clara

She has a high school musical the movie..

Trey

Yeah, High School Musical the movie.

Clara

Then that was like, it's so confusing speaking of all these franchises, but then there was also what I think is interesting too with the Olivia Rodrigo there was like a pop bass discourse around like, even like the driver's license song because it was about how her boyfriend ex boyfriend hooked up with Sabrina Carpenter. Allegedly, after and then the whole album is basically it's like the sort of Taylor Swift model of like, and maybe I'll get the Swifties, but it's like it's a Taylor Swift thing of like, you're sort of like relevant in like a sort of cultural discourse as well as being sort of like having this massive Disney machine behind you already.

Eli

Her name is Clara O'Malley, she lives on..

Clara

Don't do their work for them please.

Trey

Yeah, well, because Olivia Rodrigo released an album at the same time as Joshua Bassett, who I believe he was dating at the same time, who also had Disney machine behind him. And he was allegedly the one who cheated on her with Serena Carpenter. And so Olivia Rodrigo went viral. And yeah, had an amazing career

Clara

Because she was the underdog girlie.

Trey

Exactly. So there is very much power in the underdog narrative. But yeah, the point being that there is no sort of tried and true format now for minting new musicians as pop stars or superstars. Which is, I imagine a huge concern for record companies who are trying to find the next Ice Spice or Olivia Rodrigo. Especially since tick tock, I believe is developing its own sort of music discovery platform, so that people can, I guess, find new clips of music in their 10 second videos and discover their new artists. I've been seeing a lot of, have you guys seen this influencer? And I forget the name, but they go around. I think Washington Square Park mostly. And they just walk up to people. And he goes, like, do you make music? And they're like, no, do you make music? And then like, on the third or fourth, do you make music? someone's like, yeah, I do. And they're like, Oh, can we play a bit of your song to end this video? And they're like, yeah, sure. And so they just play the song of whatever musician and I've seen like, multiple of these kind of get huge numbers. And the knock on effect of that is like, will these artists songs you know, I guess become popular in whatever form but I do think like, there are people trying to you know, kick music discovery up a notch basically and we actually to tease our upcoming guests have someone who could very much speak to this who has started a new streaming platform that will hear a lot more about when the whole kind of premise behind it is discovery in music so I'm very curious to see like how this mysterious future guest describes the issue and what his solution is.

Clara

It's Diplo. Kidding.

Eli

We spent our entire, our entire marketing budget.

Clara

We're doing this podcast in a cardboard box but.

Trey

We got him we got we him

Clara

We got him.

Trey

Oh god speaking of, speaking of bad music or lack of music discovery have you guys are you guys caught up in those might be old by the time this gets out. But that plan of the base video I'm talking about? It's this creator has been around the block for a while. I think his name is Kyle something and he's done all of these kind of skits that's like, what it was like to be a ballplayer in 1934 or like how kids be after recess and he do these kinds of reenactments. So basically, he's made this video that is a parody of like, y2k electronic music called planning the base and he filmed it in the skeleton or whatever the, like One World Trade video place is and he's filmed it in like multiple different locations. And it's a duet so we've also filmed it with multiple different women. And then people are getting tired of him online because like he's used different girls for each part of the video you know, I'm talking about It's no fun if you guys don't know what I'm talking about. I think I've seen the video but what's the issue with it?

Eli

It's just the only thing I've seen on my timeline for like, weeks on end so much so that like the best tweet I've seen about it is a tweet. I was like, Have you guys seen this? Because like the joke being everyone has seen it.

Trey

Is it about though just like how Euro dance music is all similar, or what's the point? I guess?

Eli

Yeah, it's about like, the ridiculousness of the of the lyrics. Pretty much. Yeah.

Trey

I mean remember that like miya hi song.

Clara

Oh my god.

Eli

Live your life by Rihanna and TI?

Clara

Is that the song?

Eli

You're gonna be a shinning star.

Clara

Your talking about the miya hi miya ha miya haha yeah.

Eli

Can we get so live your life...

Clara

Well I did have you guys been keeping up because I haven't I've just pulled up this article but with the Fred again stuff it was so I'm we're getting a nod from our producer Jacques but basically here is I'm just gonna read you the first graph, there can be many more maligned contemporary musicians and Fred again the 29 year old producer slash DJ has become a whipping boy for quote serious electronic music fans around the world to view him as an interloper, and appropriator and a threat to all they hold dear. He is a one man culture war and artist whose very existence brings forth frenzied dialogue about authenticity in class. Last year, his viral field blog performance at Glastonbury was blasted across BBC Two and Iplayer. My twitter feed became a wall of memes and flagrant digs in the direction of Fred again in his admirers, blah, blah, blah, but like, he's basically posh, Brit School Nepo class posh, and people and I'm quoting The Face right now, because obviously I wouldn't say, um, it is interesting, though, because like, I think Fred again, I thought was a meme and because I was also seeing, it's like, oh, it's Fred from YouTube. And I thought for a second that it was Fred from YouTube, like, why for a DJ career, but I and again, I wouldn't say that I'm necessarily like, super up on this, but he's the only other one that I think has like, held both airtime and seems like he's like, kind of substantially broken through for better or worse in a big way. This year.

Trey

Is he the ne generation? Calvin Harris?

Clara

Like the Skrillex.

Eli

Fred again. Yeah. You know, well, also wasn't his song in Triangle of Sadness.

Clara

Perhaps?

Eli

Yeah. No, but I think that didn't work. I think that was a high profile. The thing that I feel like made him really big was the Skrillex with hit him and Four Tet, Skrillex, Fred again Four Tet. That was a moment. Brutal.

Clara

I do think, though, and like now that I had a chance to read this article, manically in the middle of the podcast, I do think what's interesting with the fret again, discourse is also like the authenticity question because I can't remember who we were talking about, like the Bobbie girl is like an industry plan. And his like, the debate with him not being authentic has more to do with just his ability to pay his way and become a massive DJ because his family is so wealthy, like, basically saying that he's just like, riding on the coattails of like being able to spend to be talented. And not to say that like he isn't talented, like lots of people have said like, yeah, well, he actually is good. But I think that there's also like, in the sort of, like nepo baby discourse in general that we're having to like, take it back to Hollywood even to or like if you're talking about like the next it girl like all of these model girlies like the Hadid sisters and like, even like a Lily Rose Depp like I think that it does feel sometimes if you are looking across culture or like say there's like a music genre that you really love. It's like, well, nobody is like breaking through on talent alone, the way that I think it's easy to sort of, like, romanticize that once they did, and maybe people did more to like a greater extent, but I think there's always been these like, industry machinations at play. But like, I do think that like, we are in kind of a weird time where the talent to money ratio or like the money that you need to have in order to be famous and to break through. Whether that's coming from an industry backing like a studio or a franchise or like your family money is like definitely kind of like, exponentially greater.

Eli

Yeah, speaking of the Hadids real quick. I just found out that there's a third one.

Trey

No. We got better topics.

Clara

Not. You're talking about like, Alana Hadid.

Eli

Yeah.

Clara

I thought you just found out about Anwar?

Eli

Oh, no. So this would be the fourth one, but this is okay. Sorry go on.

Trey

It's like that SNL skit where it's like, I'm Dixie.

Clara

I thought you were talking about the one where it's like, I'm Kim. I'm Chloe and or no it's. I'm Kim. I'm Courtney. And I'm third. Chloe says that, but it is kind of yeah, there's always a third one isn't there?

Eli

Yeah. Okay, sorry.

Trey

No, I was just gonna mention there was from the 90s this clip of TLC that went oh, God, I keep saying went viral, but it was the 90s So that was probably not possible. But there's a really interesting clip of I think gets like T-balls are left-eye from TLC kind of breaking down their record deal and how, you know, they got paid like X million for their album. And then they had to split it in three ways and then take out the production costs for making the album as well as filming all the music videos. And then they had to take the taxes out. And like after all these deductions, basically this fee for like this A&R person, this fee for the PR this fee for whatever they were left with, like, basically not even enough to buy their own house. So I think if there was Mega Millions in the music industry back in the 90s, and early 2000s, where they would like have these lavish press trips to like fly journalists out just to listen to an album with somebody in like, wherever it was recorded, or, you know, all of these kind of major ways of promoting albums and filming lavish music videos to, you know, air on MTV, and not just YouTube that's like sponsored by iOS lip balm. And now there's just like, no money anywhere, because and this kind of ties back to what we were saying about Hollywood's issue. Every major culture industry has shifted to a model that was started out as an experiment streaming, and they thought would be profitable, and is not as profitable as like the old systems that were working for everyone. And it was like change for the sake of change. And now we are all reaping the benefits. And by we I mean consumers because everything is shittier and don't bleep me on that.

Eli

Folks you can stream Day One FM on Spotify, Apple podcasts, wherever you get your music and podcasts. But I agree. I mean, I was reading in Lucas Shaw's piece on Bloomberg that I referenced earlier, he there's something like 100,000 songs are uploaded Spotify every day. I think the barrier to entry the sounds brutal, because like, I guess in some ways has, again benefit benefited us as consumers because we have like an insane amount of access to artists and musicians that we never would have had before. And we can post our own podcast, to the platform for people to listen to. But I think the barrier to entry is so low that the monetary incentives are also insanely low, like you're making cents on the dollar for each stream. So the only way that you can make money now as an artist is to tour and the only people and again it's like the 0.1% of people who are touring at whatever the Coliseum or you know sparking earthquakes in wherever the fuck or you know.

Trey

Yeah, I know. So it basically is the only people who can make money from becoming a famous musician now are the Nepo baby people anyways, like who wants to enter the enter the industry to like beg for a chump change from their record label to record an okay, record that maybe gets heard and then have to pay out of pocket for their own tour, which basically probably doesn't even make back its own budget.

Eli

Today on the pod, the crew discovers systemic inequality.

Trey

I do want to talk to you about like, speaking of the kind of quality of output and this is just completely my own personal thing, but I've been listening nonstop to the new Travis Scott album have you guys?

Eli

Snooze so boring.

Trey

I just like I'm still in shock about how much it cribs Yeezus. The Ye album that Travis Scott also produced and how Travis brought out Ye, at his concert, I think in Rome. And like there was some sort of suddenly there's earthquakes sparked by concerts. I don't know, it feels very like, is this news? But I just like I can't get over how something could be put out could I guess, atop the Billboard charts, if that's what we want to reference and be so similar sounding to something that came out in 2013?

Eli

Yeah, well, I feel like it's because these are all feedback loops, because a lot of these streaming platforms are, I mean rolling my own eyes, but are like, you know, built around algorithms which are a sense, which are in a sense feedback loops. So like you're listening to a song and then the song that you get served is meant to sound similar to the song that you were just listening to. So you get this like homogenizing effect where Travis Scott's album sounds like Yeezus which sounds like I don't know insert other artists before that, you know, so...

Trey

Blackie don't erase Blackie who was cribbed by Yeezus. Basically, they like sort of Death Grips esque black artist that was very cool and interesting and making experimental music that blackie like Ye and Travis kind of cribbed and then there were all these interviews around the release of Yeezus that were like Oh, Blackie, isn't this your sound basically and they were like, Yeah, like streaming music instead kind of thing, but like, yeah, this sucks. And then once again, the conversations been like re-upped because it once again, it's like the same thing. I mean, don't get me wrong I liked this record because it sounds exactly like Yeezus which I also liked and unapologetically.

Clara

I think and I don't know, this is also maybe like my own personal opinion, I think what's interesting now in as like a younger artist or creative and I think you see this like, maybe more clearly or at least like I hear this sentiment more clearly like in more of like fashion circles. But I think it's like in this example, for instance, it's like Travis Scott and Kanye West, these massive artists basically looking down to these younger artists for like inspiration, pulling all of their sort of like key, like design elements, or like in the case of music, like pulling their sound, and then giving it into this massive platform, but also their platform, like not collaborating with this artist, but like, taking pretty directly from their work. And I think it's in like, that's another part of like this, Clara, Trey and Eli discover systemic inequality. But I do think like, it's particularly now because there is the internet and there's like this massive archive, if you want to go through it of like rising talent and like rising artists, that you're basically just fodder in the machine for like, I don't know, like someone at LVMH to be like, throw your design on a mood board and be like, let's make that really Yeah, like let's Shein that. And I think it's also really hard to like, even like do the thing about AI like asked for like consent compensation, and whatever you said, and control, like you don't have those things even in even outside. You don't have those even in like outside of AI stuff either. You know, like it's all getting ripped. And by someone.

Trey

I'll make this short, but like I follow one granary, which is my alma mater, Central Saint Martin's a design school in London. And they have like, a really interesting publication that is completely focused on young fashion creatives. But from their Instagram account, I've noticed like at least the past five posts have all been like memes about giving up before you even get started, essentially. And I feel like there's something going on where young people don't even feel this like sense of hope anymore. Like they can enter the fashion industry and make change or even anything without being either ripped off first by a giant label, or just like not able to show their work and have it be seen on the platform that they want it to be seen on. So I think we are running out of to the kind of point of Zoom harvesting our facial data, we are running out of like source material to kind of rework. So everything is kind of a copy of a copy of a copy now and we are left with Utopia by Travis Scott,

Eli

Folks. So that's why we're an audio only podcast, no Zoom. Previously of Zoom, Day One FM previously of Zoom.

Clara

Previously of Zoom now of robot.

Eli

House of zoom. Thank you, Clara. Well, I'm excited. I'm excited as I'm sure we all are to really dive further into this topic with

Trey

Dive off a cliff.

Clara

I'm excited. Yeah.

Eli

Let me try that again. All right. Well, that was a great conversation. Thank you both. Still waiting on my UPS application to go through. But excited to dive further into this with our next guest, who I'm sure will have a lot to say about the music industry, streaming, etc. as a whole. Thanks for tuning in. Yo, thanks for tuning in. Stay up to date with all things Day One FM by subscribing to our page on Spotify, following us on Instagram @d1a, staying up to date with the latest trends and insights on d1a.com/perspective.